World's first floating wind farm starts production in Scotland
2017-10-19 16:17:00

UK-SCOTLAND-NORWAY-FLOATING WIND FARM

Photo taken on Aug. 15, 2017 provided by Norwegian company Statoil shows the world's first floating wind farm 25 km offshore Peterhead in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, Britain. The first floating wind farm in the world off the coast of Scotland has started to deliver electricity to the Scottish grid, said its operator, Norwegian multinational oil and gas company Statoil, on Wednesday. The 30MW wind farm named Hywind Scotland will power approximately 20,000 households, Statoil said in a statement. (Xinhua/Statoil/Oyvind Gravas)

OSLO, Oct. 18 -- The first floating wind farm in the world off the coast of Scotland has started to deliver electricity to the Scottish grid, said its operator, Norwegian multinational oil and gas company Statoil, on Wednesday.

The 30MW wind farm, named Hywind Scotland, is located 25 km offshore Peterhead in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and will power approximately 20,000 households, Statoil said in a statement.

It is operated by Statoil in partnership with Masdar, a renewable energy company based in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

"Hywind can be used for water depths up to 800 meters, thus opening up areas that so far have been inaccessible for offshore wind," Irene Rummelhoff, executive vice president of the New Energy Solutions business area in Statoil, was quoted as saying.

"The learnings from Hywind Scotland will pave the way for new global market opportunities for floating offshore wind energy," she said.

In an opening event in Aberdeen, Scotland, on Wednesday, Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon officially opened the floating wind farm.

"I am delighted to open Hywind Scotland -- the world's first floating wind farm," Sturgeon said. "This marks an exciting development for renewable energy in Scotland."

The project "will help us meet our ambitious climate change targets" and "positions Scotland as a world centre for energy innovation," she said.

In recent years, there have been significant cost reductions in both the onshore and bottom fixed offshore wind sectors. Floating wind is expected to follow a similar downward trajectory over the next decade, making it cost competitive with other renewable energy sources, according to Statoil.

Source:Xinhua Editor:Amanda